Cook County Recorder of Deeds Karen A. Yarbrough is supporting legislation in the General Assembly that will increase the number of documents that can be “e-recorded,” a move that will result in greater efficiency and reduce the amount of paper needed for recording transactions.

karen yarbrough cook county recorder of deeds

Electronic recording – known simply as “e-recording” – is the process of submitting and processing documents to be recorded through the Internet, rather than by physically bringing or mailing paper copies to the Recorder of Deeds office. With a robust e-recording system in place, heavy-volume users like title companies can prepare and submit documents from their office, and Recorder’s Office staff verifies and processes the transaction on the receiving end – all without the need for paper and hand-entry by Recorder’s Office staff.

“E-recording is most definitely the future of land records management, and will give taxpayers a more modern and more efficient office,” Yarbrough said. “It also has the added benefit of less paper, which makes us better stewards of our natural resources.”

The Cook County Recorder of Deeds currently accepts a limited amount of documents through electronic recording, but because state law does not allow documents that convey or transfer property to be e-recorded, Yarbrough is backing House Bill 5613. This legislation will allow for the purchasing and verification of real estate transfer stamps – required at the state, county and municipal level – to be handled electronically. Under the current system, transfer stamps must be purchased by the filer and affixed to documents.

In addition to backing HB 5613, Recorder Yarbrough is putting efficiency and fiscal responsibility first through smart budgetary management. The current Fiscal Year 2014 operating budget is less than the previous year, and Recorder Yarbrough is currently implementing streamlined workflows.

“‘Accuracy, Efficiency and Advocacy’ is the motto of this Office, and supporting this e-recording legislation checks all three of those boxes and ensures we are doing more with less,” Yarbrough said.