Recorder of Deeds Office, circa 1906

Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office, circa 1906

SPECIAL EVENT: WEDS, NOVEMBER 18 at 10:30 AM, ROOM 120 OF DOWNTOWN OFFICE; INCLUDES JESSE WHITE AND CAROL MOSELEY BRAUN

Upon taking office, Cook County Recorder of Deeds Karen A. Yarbrough noticed that there were no pictures of past Recorders of Deeds in the office, and in fact, there was nothing in the office that commemorated the history of this important county agency.

Believing that an effort to trace the history of this office would be of interest to the public, given how many people visit our office for historical research, Yarbrough asked staff to look far and wide to find as many photos, images, engravings, and the like, of past Recorders and Registrars in Cook County. Though not all images were able to be located, twenty were found, and all who held the office of Recorder of Deeds were identified.

Cook County Recorder of Deeds, circa 1908

Cook County Recorder of Deeds, circa 1908

On Wednesday, November 18, CCRD will publicly unveil a historical display, charting this history of the Cook County Recorder of Deeds Office not only through those who have served, but alongside important Chicago, Cook County and world history events, to provide historical context. The display will show how the the office was present for so many architectural innovations that made Chicago a world-class city, innovations that include the first skyscraper, and the many times our city has been home to the world’s largest or tallest buildings.

Recorder Yarbrough will honor past living Recorders, including Jesse White, Carol Moseley Braun, and Eugene “Gene” Moore, in a ceremony on Wednesday, November 18, at 10:30 AM in Room 120 of CCRD’s Downtown Office. The Office’s oldest record books, dating back to the early 1870s, will also be on display. All who are interested are invited, especially those who work in the real estate and title insurance industry.

Recorder Yarbrough hopes that by promoting the history of CCRD, more links, photos and artifacts thought lost to time will surface, and the story of public land records will receive its due honor as the mechanism by which regular people can afford to acquire and hold private property.

The Office will soon unveil an online history page to consolidate the voluminous amounts of documents uncovered.